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2014 on Stumped

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Children playing on the pitch at Kent County Cricket Club (Image by Stumped)

For a number of reasons, 2013 has been a bit of a taxing year, but 2014 sees me embarking on a new career which should hopefully allow me to spend more time on my writing. I have lots of ideas, but sadly I haven’t yet had enough time to develop many of them, and I am looking forward to doing this in 2014.

I am currently working on an in-depth preview of the Women’s Ashes, which starts on 10th January and follows a similar structure to the Ashes series that took place in England last summer.

I also plan to countdown to the 2014 County cricket season with a series of weekly previews, each concentrating on one County. This will look back at their successes and failures in 2013, analyse the the players that have come and gone and try to foresee how they might fare in 2014.

I also want to write about a number of wider issues, such as the future of Test cricket, the decline of the West Indies cricket team and the difficult question of match fixing in County cricket.

As a Kent and England fan, I will look back on 2013 with mixed emotions, but, thankfully with my passion for the game intact, and with lots of excitement for the upcoming year.

Follow The Ashes on @ByTheMinCricket

I will be live tweeting the morning session of day 2 of the Adelaide Test via @ByTheMinCricket – come and join us to keep up to date and feel free to get involved

              @ByTheMinCricket                                           www.twitter.com/ByTheMinCricket

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1st Ashes Test – Brisbane 1974/75 series

Right, i’m just putting the final touches to a piece about Alastair Cook which i’ll be posting tomorrow morning, but in the mean time, here is something to whet your appetite for the opening test match at The Gabba in Brisbane. This is the opening test match of the 74/75 Ashes series, featuring a Tour de Force from Australia fast bowler Jeff Thompson (Warning: It’s not pretty viewing for us England fans…)

Another bloody blog about Sachin Tendulkar

After much discussion, media hype and twitter hyperbole from all sides, it is finally upon us, Sachin Tendulkar is playing his last game of professional cricket. You don’t need me to tell you how good he was, what a fabulous advocate he was for the game of cricket or what an inspiration he was to millions of his countrymen, we’ve seen it all over the last quarter of a century. Whether he scores a fine century or gets run out without facing a ball is pretty irrelevant, though this particular soppy old git would like to see at least a few reminders of why we’re getting so excited about him.

Perhaps bizarrely, my main interest in all this isn’t really the cricketing aspect, at his peak, Tendulkar was an incredible player, but his fame, in India at least, goes way beyond that. he’s come to represent the growth and confidence of an entire nation.

We mustn’t get carried away, of course, India is still ridden with poverty, graft and corruption still pervades, but slowly and defiantly it is moving from a divided, post colonial mess, towards a modern, secular society. The liberal economic policies of the 1990s have seen GDP per capita rise from $352 when Tendulkar was making his Test debut in 1989, to $1414 today. With such incredible economic growth and the fact that it’s the worlds largest democracy, India has much to be proud of, but a long way still to travel.

As often happens, the outlet for much of this pride is sport, and cricket in particular. Cricket has long been an obsession for many Indians, but the reign of King Sachin, has seen a great deal of success for the national team, and of the course the explosion of T20, which may have been invented in England, but has been turned into a sporting and financial success in India. In a nation often divided by geography and caste, he has been a figurehead for all Indians, a mast which has been used to haul up the billowing flag of a nation that is confident, that is going places and that others need to respect. His own personality helps, he’s a modest man, devoted to and very protective of his family. Cricket has of course made him very wealthy, with a variety of business interests, which perhaps, makes him and even better symbol of modern India. He has used his position to support underprivileged children in his native Mumbai, though his fame makes visiting the slums almost impossible. He looks likely to take up politics after cricket.

It is ironic, that Tendulkar was not, perhaps, a stand out player in the smash and grab of T20 cricket, he only ever played 1 international T20 match for India, though his domestic T20 average of 32.9 is not to be sniffed it, The fact is that his reputation was already sealed by then, his record in Test and one day cricket is incredible, and many of his records look set to stand for some time, particularly with the way the game, particularly in the sub-continent, is tilting towards the shorter format of the game. Some perspective is required however; yes, he was an incredible player, capable of playing aggressively against the finest bowlers of his generation, but he was often surrounded by many other great players, both in his own team and amongst the opposition. Looking at the India team of 2013, he’s almost a relic, normally when a great player retires it leaves a yawning gap, but in this case I’m not convinced it does, MS Dhoni is a fine captain and a rambunctious player, Virat Kohli, perhaps the first great product of the T20 generation.

AS I finish this, Tendulkar has just taken to the crease, enjoy your last hurrah Sachin, you’ve earned it. India will miss you, but Indian cricket probably won’t.

Ashes 2013 : England – (Almost) Half Term Report Card

Despite how tired England’s players may have felt after such a dominant display in the second test, one suspects they might almost have preferred to carry on the initiative and go straight into the third test. Instead, Australia have a brief chance to regroup, lick their wounds and for their batsmen to score some confidence boosting runs in their tour match against Sussex at Hove.

The England players and management will feel rightly proud of the 2-0 lead they hold in this series, but I’m sure they will also be acutely aware that they’ve been playing quite a poor Australian team, and that there are still areas in which they can improve.

I thought I’d take the opportunity to cast my eyes over how the England players have performed so far.

Alistair Cook  6/10
Despite the teams overall success, Cook’s own batting has been forgettable, averaging just over 20 in the first two tests, and never really giving the impression he was settled at the crease.

Joe Root  8/10
Midway through the second test I imagine more than one journalist was drafting a piece about whether it was right to promote the 22 year-old to an openers role, only to hit delete after his incredible score of 180 in the second innings. Root exuded a calm, imperiousness in that innings, but he’ll need to improve his consistency if he’s to put questions about his fragility against the new ball to bed. Has also demonstrated an increasing confidence with the ball in his hand and it will be interesting to see whether he gets more opportunities in future.

Jonathan Trott  6/10
A player that firmly divides opinion, but who came into this series as one of England’s most consistent players. Sadly his performances so far in the Ashes have been hit and miss, putting in decent knocks in the first innings of each match (48 and 58) before going for a duck in each of his second innings performances.

Kevin Pietersen  4/10
After months of speculation about his fitness, and whether England could win the Ashes without him, Pietersen has been little more than a side story so. With the possibility than he may miss the third test due to injury, we have at least been reminded, once again, that one player does not make a team.

Ian Bell  9/10
If there was one player in the England side with an awful lot to prove going into this series, then it was Ian Bell. I’ve always been a fan, but there have been increasingly frequent moments in the last couple of years when I have questioned his place in the side. Two fine centuries have silence the doubters and are the sign of a man at the peak of his powers, let’s hope for more of the same.

Jonny Bairstow  6/10
A fine partnership of 144 with Ian Bell in the second test has been his highlight, but you can’t help feeling that there is more to come from him.

Matt Prior  6/10
Has been his usual consistent self behind the stumps, but disappointing in front of them. If Australia can rally then he’ll need to step up with more valuable middle order runs.

Stuart Broad  7/10
His bowling has been good, without perhaps ever looking truly dangerous, but he has proved a useful foil, ensuring that even when Anderson and Swann aren’t bowling the Australian batsmen have never been able to relax. Has also contributed valuable runs in both matches. The controversy over whether he should have walked or not should simply stand to remind us that first and foremost, the game is about winning.

Tim Bresnan  7/10
Brought in for the second match to replace the disappointing Steven Finn, Bresnan looked much more like his old self, taking 4 wickets and contributing some useful runs in the first innings. I think his all round contribution is deserving of a permanent spot.

James Anderson  8/10
Outstanding in the first test at Trent Bridge, with a pair of 5 wicket hauls, not quite as good at Lords, but still an essential part of the England attack and now deservedly held up as one of the two outstanding fast bowlers of his generation.

Graeme Swann  8/10
Decent in the first test then almost unplayable in the second, taking 9 wickets in the match. Much of the build up to this series has focussed on England’s two truly world-class bowlers and while some of the batsmen have misfired at times, it’s these two that have proved the real match winners.

Welcome to Stumped

Welcome to stumpedblog.com, the aim of the blog is to bring you an interesting and somewhat  irreverant take on the world of cricket.

Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting a number of articles i’ve written so far, with the long term aim of adding a new blog piece at least once a week after that (more if time allows, or i’m feeling particularly verbose).

Topics will vary, but you are more likely to find articles about the more interesting details of the sport, rather than any match details or gossip. I’m also aiming to bring you regular profiles of some of the players that history may have forgotten.

I’d love to hear your feedback and comments on any subject, please contact me via this blog or on twitter @stumpedblog .

Stumped.