Tag Archives: Jonathan Trott

Ashes 2013 : England – (Almost) Half Term Report Card

Despite how tired England’s players may have felt after such a dominant display in the second test, one suspects they might almost have preferred to carry on the initiative and go straight into the third test. Instead, Australia have a brief chance to regroup, lick their wounds and for their batsmen to score some confidence boosting runs in their tour match against Sussex at Hove.

The England players and management will feel rightly proud of the 2-0 lead they hold in this series, but I’m sure they will also be acutely aware that they’ve been playing quite a poor Australian team, and that there are still areas in which they can improve.

I thought I’d take the opportunity to cast my eyes over how the England players have performed so far.

Alistair Cook  6/10
Despite the teams overall success, Cook’s own batting has been forgettable, averaging just over 20 in the first two tests, and never really giving the impression he was settled at the crease.

Joe Root  8/10
Midway through the second test I imagine more than one journalist was drafting a piece about whether it was right to promote the 22 year-old to an openers role, only to hit delete after his incredible score of 180 in the second innings. Root exuded a calm, imperiousness in that innings, but he’ll need to improve his consistency if he’s to put questions about his fragility against the new ball to bed. Has also demonstrated an increasing confidence with the ball in his hand and it will be interesting to see whether he gets more opportunities in future.

Jonathan Trott  6/10
A player that firmly divides opinion, but who came into this series as one of England’s most consistent players. Sadly his performances so far in the Ashes have been hit and miss, putting in decent knocks in the first innings of each match (48 and 58) before going for a duck in each of his second innings performances.

Kevin Pietersen  4/10
After months of speculation about his fitness, and whether England could win the Ashes without him, Pietersen has been little more than a side story so. With the possibility than he may miss the third test due to injury, we have at least been reminded, once again, that one player does not make a team.

Ian Bell  9/10
If there was one player in the England side with an awful lot to prove going into this series, then it was Ian Bell. I’ve always been a fan, but there have been increasingly frequent moments in the last couple of years when I have questioned his place in the side. Two fine centuries have silence the doubters and are the sign of a man at the peak of his powers, let’s hope for more of the same.

Jonny Bairstow  6/10
A fine partnership of 144 with Ian Bell in the second test has been his highlight, but you can’t help feeling that there is more to come from him.

Matt Prior  6/10
Has been his usual consistent self behind the stumps, but disappointing in front of them. If Australia can rally then he’ll need to step up with more valuable middle order runs.

Stuart Broad  7/10
His bowling has been good, without perhaps ever looking truly dangerous, but he has proved a useful foil, ensuring that even when Anderson and Swann aren’t bowling the Australian batsmen have never been able to relax. Has also contributed valuable runs in both matches. The controversy over whether he should have walked or not should simply stand to remind us that first and foremost, the game is about winning.

Tim Bresnan  7/10
Brought in for the second match to replace the disappointing Steven Finn, Bresnan looked much more like his old self, taking 4 wickets and contributing some useful runs in the first innings. I think his all round contribution is deserving of a permanent spot.

James Anderson  8/10
Outstanding in the first test at Trent Bridge, with a pair of 5 wicket hauls, not quite as good at Lords, but still an essential part of the England attack and now deservedly held up as one of the two outstanding fast bowlers of his generation.

Graeme Swann  8/10
Decent in the first test then almost unplayable in the second, taking 9 wickets in the match. Much of the build up to this series has focussed on England’s two truly world-class bowlers and while some of the batsmen have misfired at times, it’s these two that have proved the real match winners.